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JIS students learn Japanese culture

A GROUP of 13 students from Jerudong International School (JIS) yesterday morning gained a better understanding of the rich Japanese culture and customs during a sushi-making session and traditional Japanese tea ceremony hosted by the Japanese Ambassador to Brunei Darussalam, Noriko Iki at her official residence.

The students were participating in a week-long programme of enrichment activities held annually by JIS.

The students made their very own sushi under the supervision of experienced Japanese Chef, Usuki. The traditional Japanese tea ceremony was conducted by Akiko Katagiri.

The teacher in charge of the school’s Japanese Enrichment Week Programme, Head of Geography Andy McCulloch explained his motivation for setting up the programme.

“As a participant in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) programme between 2000-2003 which is a Japanese government-run programme aimed at promoting grass roots international exchange between Japan and other nations, I have a deep and ongoing interest in the language and culture of the country.”

JIS students taking an interest in the traditional Japanese tea ceremony

JIS students taking an interest in the traditional Japanese tea ceremony

Trying to make their own sushi under the guidance of Chef Usuki. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

Trying to make their own sushi under the guidance of Chef Usuki. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

Through teaching Geography at JIS, he said, “I have come to realise that Japan is a place that holds a fascination for many people and there is a real desire among our students to learn more about the country and its people. Offering a course on Japanese language and culture during our Enrichment Week seemed to be the perfect opportunity to enable students to take their interest further.”

He added, “I hope that by the end of the four-day programme, the students will have learnt some basic communication skills and will be inclined to take their interest in Japan further still.”

The Japanese Ambassador said she was very pleased to welcome the JIS students and watch their reaction when they experienced the tea ceremony and made traditional sushi.

Also present was Russell Mann, the Dean of Higher Education and Careers of JIS.

Borneo Bulletin | James Kon | June 29, 2016




JIS’s Junior School raises $7,080 for special needs kids

THE Jerudong International School (JIS) supports a number of local charities and this week its Junior School raised a total of $7,080 for children with special needs in the country.

With the money raised in school and in consultation with the Special Needs Unit, the fundraising activity enabled JIS’s Junior School to present children recipients with equipments yesterday to assist them with their learning and mobility.

Among the recipients and their gifts were Ahmad Hazeeq Fadhillah from Delima Satu Primary School who received a special laptop; Awangku Mohammed Wafiuddin from Lambak Kiri Secondary School who received an iPad; Mohammed Hadie Putra from Pehin Datu Seri Maharaja Secondary School who received a special desk for his studies; Mohammad Syahmi from Pusar Ulak Primary School who also received a special desk; and Nur Adlina Syukriah, a visually impaired student from Rimba II Primary School, who received a laptop with installed software to help her with reading and listening skills.

Head of the Junior School, Paul Bannister, said that he believes the annual Fundraising Week provides a great opportunity for the children to actively give something back to the wider local community.

Representatives from the Jerudong International School’s Junior School present five students with gifts of equipment to help them with their learning and mobility. – AZIZ IDRIS

Representatives from the Jerudong International School’s Junior School present five students with gifts of equipment to help them with their learning and mobility. – AZIZ IDRIS

“Seeing the difference that they can make to help other children overcome challenges in their education really helps them to understand the benefits of giving to others,” he added.

The students themselves had been enthusiastic in actively participating throughout the week’s fundraiser, which featured activities such as ‘Dollar for a Job’, ‘Coin Drop – Every Little Bit Counts’, ‘Bake Sale’ and ‘Launch a Teddy’.

Borneo Bulletin | Aziz Idris | June 21, 2016




‘STOP EATING TO STARVE SHARK TRADE’

John Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign in Asia and head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental non-governmental organisation Avelife, talks to JIS students yesterday. Picture: BT/ Rabiatul Kamit

John Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign in Asia and head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental non-governmental organisation Avelife, talks to JIS students yesterday. Picture: BT/ Rabiatul Kamit

A MARINE conservationist is calling on consumers to shun away from consuming shark fin soup in a bid to topple the multi-billion dollar industry.

Jason Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign across Asia, said that the public must end their demand for the popular delicacy in order to cripple the profit incentive fuelling the global hunt for the endangered animal.

“We need to understand that it is our demand on a very limited supply that’s creating this problem,” he said yesterday in his talk at Jerudong International School (JIS).

As apex predators sharks play an important role in maintaining a balanced ecosystem. However, shark populations have vastly declined worldwide due to decades of over-fishing driven by high demand for shark fin soup, he said.

“We are emptying our oceans,” said Lu, who is also head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental NGO Avelife.

He advised consumers to “vote” with their dollar by choosing to not eat or consume any shark products, as well as challenging the restaurants and stores which sell shark products.

“Consumption is the lowest common denominator. The industry can collapse by promoting awareness and responsible consumerism,” he said.

He also encouraged the students to take up campaigning in an effort to help educate the public about the devastating impact of the shark fin trade.

Lu reiterated that awareness is imperative to influencing consumers to reject shark products.

“More people need to be aware about why sharks are necessary... We hope to see change happening, so that’s our ambition,” he said.

Yvonne Follows-Smith, geography teacher and JIS-Eco coordinator, said Lu was invited to the school to give a talk to the Year 12 students who are currently learning about the oceans as part of their International Baccalaureate programme.

She hoped the students will also be inspired to do community service after listening to the speaker’s campaign experience.

“We need to raise more awareness and if anybody can do it, it’s the students,” she said.

“They are concerned about the fact that, although Brunei has banned shark fins, you can still see it happening around the country,” she added.

The Brunei Times | RABIATUL KAMIT | Saturday, June 18, 2016 | BRUNEI-MUARA




John Lu speaks to JIS students on conservation, dedication

JERUDONG International School (JIS) yesterday invited John Lu of Shark Savers – an international organisation aimed at protecting sharks – to speak to the school’s Year 12 IB Diploma Geographers on the importance of shark conservation as well as the importance of dedication in trying to achieve difficult goals.

Speaking on his campaign to stop the killing of sharks for its fins, John Lu said that the most important thing is to stay dedicated. “If you want to campaign for something that you think is right, hold on to it like a pit bull.”

Shark Fin was a very popular delicacy, especially in the Chinese community, so his campaign was going against all odds. But with strong will and dedication, as well as a bit of love, he managed to bring the campaign into an epidemic success on a global proportion.

Since he began his campaign, trade and consumption on shark fins has gone down about 50 per cent in Hong Kong and 70 per cent in China and in other countries there were also decreased amount of consumption

His believed in educating people, in particular on the importance of keeping the circle of life in good shape, rather than through displaying or showing bloodied images or making harsh rallies or public demonstrations. “Not knowing why, people will not be motivated to do something,”

He said his campaign is successful and far-reaching because it is centred on making people understand the impact on the world and on them if shark numbers continue to diminish. He places emphasis on the important role sharks have in the food chain cycle in the ocean.

John Lu of Shark Savers in a group photo with some of the students. – AZARAIMY HH

John Lu of Shark Savers in a group photo with some of the students. – AZARAIMY HH

From bringing the interest of conservation powerhouses WWF and WildAid to getting airtime on National Geographic and high-profile celebrity endorsements – the campaign has grown to the point where “no one would refuse us”, says Lu. The best part is, he said, everything about this grassroots movement is done on a pro bono basis.

According to John Lu, this was his second time in Brunei; the first was when Brunei declared the banning of shark fins.

Yvonne Follows-Smith, a Geography teacher at JIS, said the Year 12 IB students just started a unit on oceans and they also are involved in some Community Action Service (CAS). Thus, as part of their IB requirements, the students need to be able to go out to do action work within the community.

She said the talk by John Lu was important not just for its academic content, but also for its motivation.

She said a lot of what John Lu was saying relates closely with the ECO JIS philosophy at JIS, because the students were very involved in the environmental matters.

In regards to shark fins, even though Brunei is amongst the first countries to ban shark fins, there are still shark fins being sold here illegally. She believed more awareness is needed to address the matter.

“If there is anyone who could do it, it is the students, because they are the ones who go out to the community and raise awareness,” she said.

Borneo Bulletin | Azaraimy HH | June 18, 2016

 


JIS honours 80 outstanding students

JERUDONG International School (JIS) held a ceremony yesterday to celebrate the academic achievements of its students and graduating Year 13 class.

Around 80 outstanding students in Year 10 to Year 13 were presented with awards at the JIS Arts Centre including Jasmin Thien, who received the Sixth Form Creative Writing Award and the Year 13 Subject Prize for History.

Speaking on the sidelines of the event, the visually impaired student hoped her academic achievements will inspire others to overcome challenges.

“You can do anything you want even if you think you can’t, even if people say you can’t. You have to take the first step... Even if it’s hard at first and you want to give up, just keep putting one foot in front of another. You’ll eventually get there,” said Thien.

The 19-year-old also believed that love and appreciation for learning is the key to achieving academic success.

“If you genuinely love studying or learning new things, you’ll realise how important it is... Appreciate your education, because it’s such a huge gift. I think education is the most amazing gift you can give anybody in life,” she pointed out.

Following sixth form, Thien planned to take a gap year before pursuing a joint degree in Psychology and English Literature at a university in Canada or the United Kingdom.

Besides academic awards, the students were recognised for achieving excellence in areas such as arts, sports and service.

Among the recipients were scholars under the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Religious Affairs.

The ceremony also saw the presentation of certificates to about 140 students of the graduating Year 13 class.

JIS Principal Barnaby Sandow in his address commended the students for taking the lead in numerous school initiatives such as the TEDx Youth@Gadong Conference, house music concerts and various lunchtime lectures.

He added the students’ largest legacy was the Polio Points programme, where points earned for school achievements were used towards buying polio vaccinations in developing countries.

“It’s a very simple idea, but it’s massively powerful. It meant that all our students have bought into an idea where they are trying to be the very best they can be. This was a student-led initiative that has made that impact happen,” said Sandow.

Brunei Times | RABIATUL KAMIT | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | BRUNEI-MUARA