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An Architectural Masterpiece: Designed to Inspire

2-day choir extravanganza at Jerudong International School

Syafiq Affendy

Datin Paduka Hjh Adina binti Othman, the Deputy Minister of Culture, Youth and Sports (L) with other distinguished guests at the event

Maktab Sains' 'Suara Excelsior' Senior choir singing 'We Are Young'. PHOTOS: IZAH AZAHARI

For the first time ever in Brunei, over 300 singers and teachers from 14 choirs joined together for a two-day extravaganza of singing, dubbed the 'Sing Out' held at the Jerudong International School yesterday.

A showcase demonstration was held at the Auditorium of the Jerudong International School's Arts Centre to an appreciative audience of parents and invited guests, including the guest of honour, Datin Paduka Hjh Adina binti Othman, the Deputy Minister of Culture, Youth and Sports.

Participating schools in this year's Choir Festival were Sayyidina Husain Secondary School, Rimba I Secondary School, Meragang Sixth Form Centre, Tanjong Maya Secondary School, Maktab Sains Paduka Seri Begawan Sultan (Senior and Junior choirs), the Raja Isteri Girl's High School (STPRI), Lambak Kiri Secondary School, Sufri Bolkiah Secondary School, Sultan Muhammad Jamalul Alam Secondary School, Rimba II Secondary School, Masin Secondary School and host school Jerudong International School. Also taking part was the Polytechnic Choir Club.

The aim of this Festival was for participating choirs to join together, for the purpose of creating a combined interschool massed choir to sing the chosen Festival song. Under the direction of specialist choir teachers both local and abroad, a balanced programme of both unison was rehearsed over two days and then showcased for parents and guests.

Among the songs belted out were the Brunei National Anthem, Jangan Sesali (with the choir backing composer/singer Zul Faden), Dindang di Dindang (Brunei folk song), Black or White (Michael Jackson), Isn't She Lovely (Stevie Wonder), Rolling in the Deep (Adele), and a medley of songs from Phantom of the Opera.

The skills learnt at the festival will equip the choirs/singers and teachers to better cope with the challenges of good choral singing practise. It also can raise the standard of choral singing in Brunei schools.

It'll be a 'Sing Out' at Choir Music Festival

Jerudong International School's Arts Centre Auditorium, where the Choir Music Festival will be held. Picture: Courtesy of Jerudong International School

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

OVER 250 students from about 12 schools all over Brunei will be joining a choir music festival which will be held in Jerudong International School (JIS) on September 29.

The Brunei Schools Choir Music Festival titled "Sing Out" will take place at JIS's Arts Centre facility at 4pm.

The festival looks to give the choirs and their teachers an enjoyable experience and take away with them valuable skills that will equip them to be able to better cope with the challenges of good choral singing practice.

Choirs will be singing contemporary and traditional songs along with their own compositions. The festival will also witness one of Brunei's top male singers, Zul Faden, singing his song "Jangan Sesali" which will be backed up by the choir and he will be premiering his latest music video, "Come Back". The Brunei Times

JIS spreads the message of peace

James Kon

1
British High Commissioner Rob Fenn presents his speech.

JIS Upper School Captains James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng.

A student throws a ball at a target as part of a game in which a bucket of water is emptied over a JIS teacher at every successful hit.

A teacher getting splashed after a hit.

JIS orchestra band members showcase their musical skills in the name of peace.

The food corner proves a big hit with the students.

 

PHOTOS; JAMES KON

The British High Commissioner to Brunei Darussalam, Mr Rob Fenn presented a Peace Week speech yesterday at the Jerudong International School, in which he highlighted the Sultanate's contributions to such a goal.

"Brunei Darussalam, as the Abode of Peace, is becoming better known internationally as the exporter of peace, through actions such as the contribution of peacekeepers to less peaceful countries in different parts of the world like Lebanon and the Philippines," he said.

"I would like to congratulate Brunei and what the country has done for the international community in the service of peace and, I think, by starting to educate the young about peace. It's a very powerful intervention," he added.

Recalling childhood memories regarding the concept of peace, he said, "When I was eight years old and schooling in Manhattan, USA, I was asked by a classmate, 'what does your daddy make?' Most of the other kids were children of industrialists who made cars, computers and so on. I replied that my daddy made peace because he was a diplomat working in the US. This led me to follow that path."

Meanwhile, Upper School Captains James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng, who have been pivotal in putting together the JIS Peace Week said, "The planning for the event actually started in March this year and with the help of students, parents and teachers, it was a success."

Both students also designed a T-shirt with the message, "Keep Calm and Spread Peace". When asked how they came up with the phrasing, they replied, "We wanted people to wear a message about peace, even after the event concludes. We came up with the wording after days of brainstorming."

The 500 T-shirts, which are being sold for B$10 apiece, will be used to help the Sangkheun Centre in Cambodia, where the funding will help build on the much-needed development of art and education for Cambodian children.
Shaded from the sun by specially constructed tents, students took part in a variety of fun activities to raise money for the cause, such as 'Beat The Goalie' and a cream pie throwing game.

Younger students seemed to prefer quieter activities such as face painting and henna decoration, all of which were organised by students of the JIS Upper School Council, led by James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng.

Throughout the week, lessons will focus on the theme of peace and students will be encouraged to reflect upon how fortunate they are to enjoy life in a stable and harmonious society.

In English, students studied the Christmas Truce held during World War I, when German and English soldiers temporarily ceased fighting in order to enjoy a friendly game of football. The message across the school was clear - it is the duty of everyone to work towards an ideal of peace in which nations and peoples respect each other's differences.

The Geography Faculty examined the thorny issue of how scarcity of resources can lead to conflict. Students considered possible solutions to this problem and created fascinating displays which were placed across the school.

The school's musicians also participated by holding special concerts at various locations. In the Middle School, string-instruments filled the corridors with melodies of peace, while the Senior School saw the brass ensemble perform for an enthusiastic audience. The musical crescendo of the week was undoubtedly the whole school's orchestra performance at the Peace Fair, in which the tunes played ranged from classical music to Malay favourites such as 'Pelan-Pelan Saja' and 'Melompat Lebih Tinggi'.Lunchtimes have been no exception to the active promotion of the message of peace, where guest speakers would present special talks.

Major Dan Duell spoke to students about the nature of international peacekeeping, drawing upon his experiences in Bosnia, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan.

During the week, the Deputy Head of the Middle School, Mr Eddy Moore described in detail the school's charitable work in Cambodia and reminded students that it is their duty to help those less fortunate than themselves.

JIS Principal Andrew Fowler Watt summed up the occasion by saying, "For me, the Annual Peace Week at JIS is one of the most important occasions in our school calendar. It highlights the United Nations message that we should all strive for world peace and harmony. This is so important and all young people should support it, both here in Brunei and elsewhere.

"JIS Peace Week also enables a great deal of money to be raised for the school's Cambodian charity, and allows all to fully understand and enjoy the activities that take place both in and out of the classroom," the principal added.

"I am extremely grateful to all those who have worked so hard to make the 2012 JIS Peace Week such a success."

JIS spreads the message of peace

James Kon

British High Commissioner Rob Fenn presents his speech.

JIS Upper School Captains James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng.

A student throws a ball at a target as part of a game in which a bucket of water is emptied over a JIS teacher at every successful hit.

A teacher getting splashed after a hit.

JIS orchestra band members showcase their musical skills in the name of peace.

The food corner proves a big hit with the students. - PHOTOS; JAMES KON

The British High Commissioner to Brunei Darussalam, Mr Rob Fenn presented a Peace Week speech yesterday at the Jerudong International School, in which he highlighted the Sultanate's contributions to such a goal.

"Brunei Darussalam, as the Abode of Peace, is becoming better known internationally as the exporter of peace, through actions such as the contribution of peacekeepers to less peaceful countries in different parts of the world like Lebanon and the Philippines," he said.

"I would like to congratulate Brunei and what the country has done for the international community in the service of peace and, I think, by starting to educate the young about peace. It's a very powerful intervention," he added.

Recalling childhood memories regarding the concept of peace, he said, "When I was eight years old and schooling in Manhattan, USA, I was asked by a classmate, 'what does your daddy make?' Most of the other kids were children of industrialists who made cars, computers and so on. I replied that my daddy made peace because he was a diplomat working in the US. This led me to follow that path."

Meanwhile, Upper School Captains James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng, who have been pivotal in putting together the JIS Peace Week said, "The planning for the event actually started in March this year and with the help of students, parents and teachers, it was a success."

Both students also designed a T-shirt with the message, "Keep Calm and Spread Peace". When asked how they came up with the phrasing, they replied, "We wanted people to wear a message about peace, even after the event concludes. We came up with the wording after days of brainstorming."

The 500 T-shirts, which are being sold for B$10 apiece, will be used to help the Sangkheun Centre in Cambodia, where the funding will help build on the much-needed development of art and education for Cambodian children.

Shaded from the sun by specially constructed tents, students took part in a variety of fun activities to raise money for the cause, such as 'Beat The Goalie' and a cream pie throwing game.

Younger students seemed to prefer quieter activities such as face painting and henna decoration, all of which were organised by students of the JIS Upper School Council, led by James Dickinson and Yu Rong Teng.

Throughout the week, lessons will focus on the theme of peace and students will be encouraged to reflect upon how fortunate they are to enjoy life in a stable and harmonious society.

In English, students studied the Christmas Truce held during World War I, when German and English soldiers temporarily ceased fighting in order to enjoy a friendly game of football. The message across the school was clear - it is the duty of everyone to work towards an ideal of peace in which nations and peoples respect each other's differences.

The Geography Faculty examined the thorny issue of how scarcity of resources can lead to conflict. Students considered possible solutions to this problem and created fascinating displays which were placed across the school.

The school's musicians also participated by holding special concerts at various locations. In the Middle School, string-instruments filled the corridors with melodies of peace, while the Senior School saw the brass ensemble perform for an enthusiastic audience. The musical crescendo of the week was undoubtedly the whole school's orchestra performance at the Peace Fair, in which the tunes played ranged from classical music to Malay favourites such as 'Pelan-Pelan Saja' and 'Melompat Lebih Tinggi'.

Lunchtimes have been no exception to the active promotion of the message of peace, where guest speakers would present special talks.

Major Dan Duell spoke to students about the nature of international peacekeeping, drawing upon his experiences in Bosnia, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan.

During the week, the Deputy Head of the Middle School, Mr Eddy Moore described in detail the school's charitable work in Cambodia and reminded students that it is their duty to help those less fortunate than themselves.

JIS Principal Andrew Fowler Watt summed up the occasion by saying, "For me, the Annual Peace Week at JIS is one of the most important occasions in our school calendar. It highlights the United Nations message that we should all strive for world peace and harmony. This is so important and all young people should support it, both here in Brunei and elsewhere.

"JIS Peace Week also enables a great deal of money to be raised for the school's Cambodian charity, and allows all to fully understand and enjoy the activities that take place both in and out of the classroom," the principal added.

"I am extremely grateful to all those who have worked so hard to make the 2012 JIS Peace Week such a success."

Apathy, ignorance causing pollution

Volunteers picking up trash which are often used for recreational purposes such as barbeques or picnics. Picture: BT/Koo Jin Shen

Collection of garbage by volunteers from the 2012 International Coastal Cleanup at Tungku Beach. Brunei's participation is organised by the Beach Bunch, a local eco-group, and participated by educational institutions and other organisations. Picture: BT/Koo Jin Shen

Monday, September 17, 2012

APATHY, lack of awareness as well as a lack of trash bins in Tungku beach were blamed for dozens of fully filled trash bags collected by volunteers during the International Coastal Cleanup campaign organised by the Beach Bunch recently.

About a 100 over volunteers from several educational institutions and other organisations took part in the clean up campaign held in Tungku beach alongside with a handful more in Seri Kenangan beach in Tutong and the Sungai Liang beach in Belait last Saturday.

The Brunei Times interviewed participants as well as site coordinators to discuss the extent of the problems of polluted beaches in Brunei.

Nazihah Sharip, 18 and a group of Jerudong International students wandered into a semi-secluded spot along the Tungku beach coastline, hidden from sight by tall grass and trees.

Instead of a beautiful pristine, untouched environment, Nazihah and her friends discovered a trash haven. After an hour and half-a-dozen black garbage bags later, the volunteers peeled away everything from styrofoam containers and cups to plastic bags and food wrappers from the greenery.

"It's very dirty," she said bluntly when asked to describe the area. She also believed that because the spot was hidden, people were inclined to throw their rubbish in the area.

She and her friends also said that people litter on the beaches because they believed "nobody is going to care," whereas some people have the mindset that "they are never going to see it again" after they have thrown away their rubbish.

"They think it's a small thing," she said, noting that they may be unaware or have forgotten that polluting beaches have an impact on the environment.

Afiqah Hamir, 17, said that seeing part of the beach in such a condition was shameful, "Brunei has some really nice beaches," she said, noting it was something great about the country. However, the sight of rubbish littering the beaches was something that was off-putting, remarking that if they were kept cleaner, she and her friends would probably frequent the beaches more.

She also believed that people littered as a matter of convenience, due to the absence of trash bins in the area, people would just leave their trash where it is instead of making a walk some distance away to dispose of it. "It's like they think it's going to magically disappear," she said.

Wan Nurul Naszeerh, 22, a volunteer taking part that day was also upset about the amount of non-degradable trash she and her friend had collected throughout the day.

"Bruneians should know better," she said, making reference to wet-wipes used for sanitary care.

Unlike tissue paper, she said, wet-wipes are not biodegradable, also noting that they had picked up other pieces of trash such as styrofoam and plastics.

"Styrofoam does not degrade; it breaks down into little pieces," she said, which is both harmful to wildlife and may eventually end up back to humans. She stressed that something had to be done, "JASTRE (Department of Parks, Recreation and Environment) needs to do something," she said, remarking that more rubbish bins could be provided.

The Brunei Times