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JIS students receive certificates for completing Japanese programme

FOURTEEN Jerudong International School (JIS) students recently received certificates from the Embassy of Japan to Brunei Darussalam to acknowledge their participation in a week-long programme of activities focused on Japanese language and culture.

On hand to present the certificates on Thursday was the Japanese Ambassador to Brunei Darussalam, Noriko Iki.

In a press release, the Japanese Embassy explained that the “Japan Experience” is one of a broad range of options the school offers as part of an annual enrichment week programme. The JIS teachers who led the programme, who have all lived and taught in Japan, were supported by Japanese Embassy officials, namely the Deputy Head of Mission Dr Toshio Kaneko and First Secretary Ms Junko Kurihara.

The Embassy Officials conducted workshops at the school, which the students found both captivating and highly enjoyable.

The closing ceremony on Thursday saw students formally introduce themselves to the Ambassador in Japanese prior to receiving their certificates. The students also showed the Ambassador and Principal of JIS, Mr Barnaby Sandow, a slide presentation of the various activities they had participated in.

Led by the Embassy officials and teachers, the students then sang a Japanese folk song, the highlight of which was the Ambassador singing the second verse of the song solo.

Japanese Ambassador and JIS Principal in a group photo with embassy officials, teachers and participants. – DANIAL NORJIDI

Japanese Ambassador and JIS Principal in a group photo with embassy officials, teachers and participants. – DANIAL NORJIDI

Earlier in the week the Ambassador hosted the students at her official residence, where they were taught how to make sushi rolls and observed a Japanese Tea ceremony.

One of group-based the students were given was the task of researching and planning a holiday for the JIS Head of Middle Years, Mr Richard Bourbon, who is due to visit Japan during the school holidays with his family.

The Japan Experience Programme Leader, Andy McCulloch, who is Head of Geography at JIS, noted that his motivation for running the programme stemmed from his participation in the Japanese government-run Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme some 15 years ago.

In his closing remarks the Principal noted that the final week of the academic year provides students with a fantastic opportunity to learn outside the classroom. He highlighted that the Japan Experience was one example of the myriad of opportunities students have to explore their own place in the wider global community, an activity that epitomised the school’s key pastoral and academic aims, such as integration, participation and active engagement.

The press release shares that, in response to words of thanks and gratitude for the wholehearted support the Japanese Embassy gave to the programme, issued by one of the programme leaders, Mr Russell Mann, Dean of Higher Education at the school, Ambassador Iki said, “I really appreciate the originality of the Enrichment Activities Programme and offer my thanks to JIS for selecting Japanese culture as a theme of the Programme.”

“I believe that the participating students have deepened their knowledge about Japan and had a great opportunity for emotional growth through coming into contact with a foreign culture. As a result, I do hope that they will have a fond view of Japan for years to come.”

The ceremony concluded with the Ambassador leading the students in ‘tejime’, a Japanese custom of ceremonial rhythmic hand clapping, performed at the end of a special event to bring the occasion to a peaceful, lively close. Tejime observes fulfilment, realisation, and completion, providing the students with a final glimpse into the richness of Japanese culture.

Borneo Bulletin | Danial Norjidi | July 02, 2016




JIS students buy vaccines to join fight against polio

JERUDONG International School (JIS) students have bought 2,500 vaccines for children in polio-affected countries since the school first started its Polio Points Programme in August last year. JIS Principal Barnaby Sandow said this recently on the sidelines of a JIS Ramadhan donation event at the school’s Arts Centre. Sandow said JIS students under the programme get awarded with a “polio point” by a teacher any time they achieved one of the school’s six values: active engagement, thinking skills, language, integration, leadership and participation.

When a student achieves all six aims and receives six polio points, the points are converted into one US dollar that goes to vaccinating one child against polio in the developing world, he said.

“The donations are done through UNICEF and the Teaspoons of Change initiative, both very much in partnership with (global awareness educator) d’Arcy Lunn,” Sandow said.

The principal said the money comes from a fund that consists of donations from companies and government agencies, as well as school fundraisers.

Students from Years 7 to 13 currently take part in the Polio Points Programme at JIS.

However, there were plans to roll out the programme to JIS primary school students this August, Sandow said.

“The (secondary school students) developed a huge momentum which has initiated a change throughout the school.

“Our parents’ group — Friends of JIS Junior — think it’s a really good idea and have been actively raising the money so that we can launch the Polio Points Programme among the junior school students in August,” he continued.

Sandow also said the programme has been “really powerful” because it had been student-led.

“It was the students in this school who first sold this idea to the other students and teachers, and who talked about how it was going to work.

“It's been a great motivator for the other students to work hard to be able to enable other children in other parts of the world to go on and do other things because otherwise they wouldn’t have had a future (without the polio vaccines),” he said.

Through the programme, the students not only better understood the school’s six values, but they were able to learn that they can make a difference.

“If our students leave this school thinking that they can go out into society and make it a better place, that has got to be a good thing,” Sandow said.

 

The Brunei Times | Amanda Yap | Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN




 

 

JIS students learn Japanese culture

A GROUP of 13 students from Jerudong International School (JIS) yesterday morning gained a better understanding of the rich Japanese culture and customs during a sushi-making session and traditional Japanese tea ceremony hosted by the Japanese Ambassador to Brunei Darussalam, Noriko Iki at her official residence.

The students were participating in a week-long programme of enrichment activities held annually by JIS.

The students made their very own sushi under the supervision of experienced Japanese Chef, Usuki. The traditional Japanese tea ceremony was conducted by Akiko Katagiri.

The teacher in charge of the school’s Japanese Enrichment Week Programme, Head of Geography Andy McCulloch explained his motivation for setting up the programme.

“As a participant in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) programme between 2000-2003 which is a Japanese government-run programme aimed at promoting grass roots international exchange between Japan and other nations, I have a deep and ongoing interest in the language and culture of the country.”

JIS students taking an interest in the traditional Japanese tea ceremony

JIS students taking an interest in the traditional Japanese tea ceremony

Trying to make their own sushi under the guidance of Chef Usuki. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

Trying to make their own sushi under the guidance of Chef Usuki. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

Through teaching Geography at JIS, he said, “I have come to realise that Japan is a place that holds a fascination for many people and there is a real desire among our students to learn more about the country and its people. Offering a course on Japanese language and culture during our Enrichment Week seemed to be the perfect opportunity to enable students to take their interest further.”

He added, “I hope that by the end of the four-day programme, the students will have learnt some basic communication skills and will be inclined to take their interest in Japan further still.”

The Japanese Ambassador said she was very pleased to welcome the JIS students and watch their reaction when they experienced the tea ceremony and made traditional sushi.

Also present was Russell Mann, the Dean of Higher Education and Careers of JIS.

Borneo Bulletin | James Kon | June 29, 2016




JIS’s Junior School raises $7,080 for special needs kids

THE Jerudong International School (JIS) supports a number of local charities and this week its Junior School raised a total of $7,080 for children with special needs in the country.

With the money raised in school and in consultation with the Special Needs Unit, the fundraising activity enabled JIS’s Junior School to present children recipients with equipments yesterday to assist them with their learning and mobility.

Among the recipients and their gifts were Ahmad Hazeeq Fadhillah from Delima Satu Primary School who received a special laptop; Awangku Mohammed Wafiuddin from Lambak Kiri Secondary School who received an iPad; Mohammed Hadie Putra from Pehin Datu Seri Maharaja Secondary School who received a special desk for his studies; Mohammad Syahmi from Pusar Ulak Primary School who also received a special desk; and Nur Adlina Syukriah, a visually impaired student from Rimba II Primary School, who received a laptop with installed software to help her with reading and listening skills.

Head of the Junior School, Paul Bannister, said that he believes the annual Fundraising Week provides a great opportunity for the children to actively give something back to the wider local community.

Representatives from the Jerudong International School’s Junior School present five students with gifts of equipment to help them with their learning and mobility. – AZIZ IDRIS

Representatives from the Jerudong International School’s Junior School present five students with gifts of equipment to help them with their learning and mobility. – AZIZ IDRIS

“Seeing the difference that they can make to help other children overcome challenges in their education really helps them to understand the benefits of giving to others,” he added.

The students themselves had been enthusiastic in actively participating throughout the week’s fundraiser, which featured activities such as ‘Dollar for a Job’, ‘Coin Drop – Every Little Bit Counts’, ‘Bake Sale’ and ‘Launch a Teddy’.

Borneo Bulletin | Aziz Idris | June 21, 2016




‘STOP EATING TO STARVE SHARK TRADE’

John Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign in Asia and head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental non-governmental organisation Avelife, talks to JIS students yesterday. Picture: BT/ Rabiatul Kamit

John Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign in Asia and head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental non-governmental organisation Avelife, talks to JIS students yesterday. Picture: BT/ Rabiatul Kamit

A MARINE conservationist is calling on consumers to shun away from consuming shark fin soup in a bid to topple the multi-billion dollar industry.

Jason Lu, organiser of the ‘I’m Finished with Fins’ campaign across Asia, said that the public must end their demand for the popular delicacy in order to cripple the profit incentive fuelling the global hunt for the endangered animal.

“We need to understand that it is our demand on a very limited supply that’s creating this problem,” he said yesterday in his talk at Jerudong International School (JIS).

As apex predators sharks play an important role in maintaining a balanced ecosystem. However, shark populations have vastly declined worldwide due to decades of over-fishing driven by high demand for shark fin soup, he said.

“We are emptying our oceans,” said Lu, who is also head of special projects at Singapore’s largest environmental NGO Avelife.

He advised consumers to “vote” with their dollar by choosing to not eat or consume any shark products, as well as challenging the restaurants and stores which sell shark products.

“Consumption is the lowest common denominator. The industry can collapse by promoting awareness and responsible consumerism,” he said.

He also encouraged the students to take up campaigning in an effort to help educate the public about the devastating impact of the shark fin trade.

Lu reiterated that awareness is imperative to influencing consumers to reject shark products.

“More people need to be aware about why sharks are necessary... We hope to see change happening, so that’s our ambition,” he said.

Yvonne Follows-Smith, geography teacher and JIS-Eco coordinator, said Lu was invited to the school to give a talk to the Year 12 students who are currently learning about the oceans as part of their International Baccalaureate programme.

She hoped the students will also be inspired to do community service after listening to the speaker’s campaign experience.

“We need to raise more awareness and if anybody can do it, it’s the students,” she said.

“They are concerned about the fact that, although Brunei has banned shark fins, you can still see it happening around the country,” she added.

The Brunei Times | RABIATUL KAMIT | Saturday, June 18, 2016 | BRUNEI-MUARA