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JIS students learn of Singapore’s success story

A GROUP of 56 Year 13 Geography students and six staff members from Jerudong International School (JIS) recently went on a four-day trip to Singapore with the aim of developing the students’ knowledge and understanding of various aspects of their ‘A’ Level and IB Diploma geography courses.

As part of the Geography ‘A’ Level course, all students will be following a unit of work entitled ‘World Cities’ and another unit looking at Urban Ecology. IB Diploma students also study a unit on ‘Urban Environments’, as well as the issues of sustainability throughout the course.

According to a press statement, the trip covered topics such as urban regeneration, ecological conservation areas, the development of green spaces within cities, the planning and implementing of sustainable urban planning, the development of an integrated, efficient and sustainable transport system in Singapore.

“This trip provides students with a fascinating case study. They are given an opportunity to learn about aspects of Singapore that will help them evaluate the nature of sustainability in the city. The trip has been successfully running for several years and is part of an extensive fieldwork programme at JIS,” explained McCulloch, Head of Geography Department at JIS.

JIS geography students toured the Urban Regeneration Agency, Housing Development Board, the Land Transport Gallery, Punggol New Town, Bishan Park, Marina Bay area, MacRitchie Reservoir, Singapore Barrage and Semakau Island. Students were investigating on what makes Singapore one of the most sustainable cities in the world today.

Year 13 Geography students in a group photo at the Land Transport Gallery in Singapore. – JIS

Year 13 Geography students in a group photo at the Land Transport Gallery in Singapore. – JIS

Borneo Bulletin | Aziz Idris | October 08, 2016




‘Knowing various languages makes you more employable’

SENIOR School students of Jerudong International School (JIS) were briefed on the advantages of learning more than one language during a recent talk delivered by Canadian High Commissioner Marina Laker (pic) at the school.

Laker, who speaks English, French, German and Greek, said that being able to communicate in various languages was an asset, and drew on her own experiences in using the different languages during her various tenures as a Canadian envoy in different parts of the world.

Laker was speaking as part of JIS’s weekly “Lunchtime Lecture” series, held every Wednesday at the school.

This week’s lecture was held in conjunction with the ‘European Day of Languages’, which falls annually on September 26.

Speaking to the students, the Canadian high commissioner emphasised that being able to speak different languages would give one an advantage over the competition, when it came to job hunting “in today’s globalised world”.

She urged the students to “take advantage” of the languages they already knew or were learning, when considering their career goals.

Laker also said that knowing different languages enables a person to learn more about other cultures and better appreciate them.

“It allows you a window in other people’s worlds,” she said.

“It leads to more tolerance and less racism, which makes for a more tolerant and harmonised society,” Laker said.

Being able to speak more than one language was also “good for the brain”, making one a better critical thinker and problem-solver, as well as a better listener, she said.

“Be proud of your linguistic heritage, never let anybody make you feel bad about the languages you speak at home.”

She also recommended for students to try and practise languages they knew as much as possible, pointing out that they can “go dormant” if unused.

According to a JIS representative, languages currently offered as subjects at the school include Malay, Mandarin, Spanish, French and Urdu.

The Brunei Times | AMANDA YAP | FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN




A humanitarian call for the young to lend a helping hand

AN INTERNATIONALLY renowned humanitarian, Peter Dalglish, yesterday, continued to share enlightening experiences with Jerudong International School (JIS) students in the hopes of inspiring the young to lend a hand to those in need.

“You are needed,” said the Canadian, who is the founder of non-governmental organisation (NGO) Street Kids International, to Year 12 and 13 students at JIS’ Arts Centre’s auditorium.

“Especially in war-affected areas,” he added.

The picture-heavy presentation by the 59-year-old depicted Dalglish’s humanitarian work during his time as a head of mission for the United Nations (UN) Habitat in Afghanistan and after. This included his time as a earthquake recovery volunteer in Nepal, where he is now based.

After his talk dubbed “Heroes of Our Future”, students had the opportunity to ask the former UN envoy, who is also an author of a book, The Courage of Children, on issues related to human rights, environmental challenges, social justice and international development.

In a JIS press statement, the talk by Dalglish was part of the effort by the school to mark the annual Peace Week, which is themed on gender equality and female empowerment, the fifth of ‘17 Goals to Transform Our World’ campaign by the UN for sustainable development.

Aside from the talk, day two’s activities included a Pop Idol Peace Week Concert that took place within the compound of the Music Faculty. Among the performers was Senyum hit-maker Aziz Harun.

Shades of pink, blue and white were also seen donned by most students, to show support of this year’s theme.

Dalglish will again take stage today, but this time to speak on higher education in North America. On Tuesday, the special JIS speaker spoke on ‘Lessons Learned From the Front Lines’.

The Brunei Times | IKHWAN SALLEH | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2016 | BRUNEI-MUARA




JIS extends Polio Points Programme to Junior School

Jerudong International School (JIS) Principal Barnaby Sandow. JIS has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month. Picture: BT/Amanda Yap

Jerudong International School (JIS) Principal Barnaby Sandow. JIS has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month. Picture: BT/Amanda Yap

JERUDONG International School (JIS) has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month when the new academic year started, the principal of JIS has said.

According to Barnaby Sandow, the school’s parents’ group, Friends of JIS Junior, had kindly donated a cheque from money raised through various events — which had allowed the school to kickstart the programme.

Under the Polio Points programme, JIS students get awarded with a “polio point” by a teacher any time they achieved one of the school’s six aims: integration, leadership, participation, active engagement, language and thinking skills.

Whenever all six of the aims are achieved by the students, the points are converted into one US dollar that goes to vaccinating a child against polio in the developing world through UNICEF.

“So a student could get two points while another could get four points — so any time points in all six aims are achieved, it becomes a dollar.

“This means that the points are not just awarded per student — it’s a collaborative effort of working together and engaging in teamwork, getting students to do as much as they can as a whole school,” Sandow said.

According to Sandow, the Polio Points Programme, which was first launched at the school at the start of the 2015/2016 academic year among the Senior School students, has resulted in about $4,000 worth of donations towards polio eradication.

“That’s 24,000 individual acts of excellence (by the students) that have gone into enabling people in the world to go and do excellent things that they might not have been able to do otherwise, if their lives had been torn apart by the horrible disease that is polio,” Sandow said.

Sandow said that the programme had entirely been student-driven and it was “a massive success” thus far, which had prompted school leaders to extend it to the younger students.

“What’s important is that every student leaves our school with the knowledge that they can make a difference and that they should go on and make a difference in the world around them.

“And that’s what we’re here for — as every school, parent and nation is — to create citizens who are imbued with a sense of global responsibility who really care about one another,” Sandow added.

The Polio Points Programme has also been running at International School Brunei (ISB) since 2012.

The Brunei Times | AMANDA YAP | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN




JIS students achieve outstanding results in global contest

STUDENTS from Jerudong International School (JIS) recently achieved outstanding results in this year’s University of New South Wales International Science and Digital Technology Competition (ICAS).

A participation by 80 JIS students in the Science competition resulted in the awarding of 10 High Distinctions, 32 Distinctions, 25 Credits, four Merits and nine certificates of participation. Of particular note was the Junior School Science medal winner, Jordan Lo, who achieved the highest mark in his age group in Brunei.

In the Digital Technology category, Nicholle Tang, Michael Koh, Jorge Perry, Niaj Sharif and Dominick Ang were awarded medals and High Distinctions while other students – ranging from Year 3 to Year 11 – received 13 Distinctions, eight Credits, two Merits, and nine certificates of participation, according to a press release.

For over 20 years, Educational Assessment Australia (EAA) of the University of New South Wales has been conducting the International Competition for Schools and is the largest independent assessment programme for schools in Brunei, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, India, South Africa, Hong Kong, China and the Pacific region.

Jordan Lo receiving a medal from JIS Head of Junior School, Paul Bannister and his teacher Mr Baker. – PHOTOS: JIS

Jordan Lo receiving a medal from JIS Head of Junior School, Paul Bannister and his teacher Mr Baker. – PHOTOS: JIS

Photographed with their Science teacher, Chris Kruger, are students Nicholle Tang, Dominick Ang, Michael Koh, and Niaj Sharif who all received high distinctions in the Digital Technology category.

Photographed with their Science teacher, Chris Kruger, are students Nicholle Tang, Dominick Ang, Michael Koh, and Niaj Sharif who all received high distinctions in the Digital Technology category.

JIS has been part of this competition – which sees around two million entries annually – for a number of years. The ICAS assess students’ academic ability in aspects of mathematics, science, English language, writing, computer skills and spelling.

The students were praised for their performance, particularly considering the competition took place during the students’ vacation period.

One of the special benefits of ICAS is that schools and students receive detailed diagnostic information about their overall performance. ICAS allow students to monitor their progress from year to year and identify individual strengths and weaknesses.

Borneo Bulletin | September 17, 2016