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JIS extends Polio Points Programme to Junior School

Jerudong International School (JIS) Principal Barnaby Sandow. JIS has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month. Picture: BT/Amanda Yap

Jerudong International School (JIS) Principal Barnaby Sandow. JIS has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month. Picture: BT/Amanda Yap

JERUDONG International School (JIS) has extended its Polio Points Programme to its Junior School students beginning last month when the new academic year started, the principal of JIS has said.

According to Barnaby Sandow, the school’s parents’ group, Friends of JIS Junior, had kindly donated a cheque from money raised through various events — which had allowed the school to kickstart the programme.

Under the Polio Points programme, JIS students get awarded with a “polio point” by a teacher any time they achieved one of the school’s six aims: integration, leadership, participation, active engagement, language and thinking skills.

Whenever all six of the aims are achieved by the students, the points are converted into one US dollar that goes to vaccinating a child against polio in the developing world through UNICEF.

“So a student could get two points while another could get four points — so any time points in all six aims are achieved, it becomes a dollar.

“This means that the points are not just awarded per student — it’s a collaborative effort of working together and engaging in teamwork, getting students to do as much as they can as a whole school,” Sandow said.

According to Sandow, the Polio Points Programme, which was first launched at the school at the start of the 2015/2016 academic year among the Senior School students, has resulted in about $4,000 worth of donations towards polio eradication.

“That’s 24,000 individual acts of excellence (by the students) that have gone into enabling people in the world to go and do excellent things that they might not have been able to do otherwise, if their lives had been torn apart by the horrible disease that is polio,” Sandow said.

Sandow said that the programme had entirely been student-driven and it was “a massive success” thus far, which had prompted school leaders to extend it to the younger students.

“What’s important is that every student leaves our school with the knowledge that they can make a difference and that they should go on and make a difference in the world around them.

“And that’s what we’re here for — as every school, parent and nation is — to create citizens who are imbued with a sense of global responsibility who really care about one another,” Sandow added.

The Polio Points Programme has also been running at International School Brunei (ISB) since 2012.

The Brunei Times | AMANDA YAP | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN




JIS students achieve outstanding results in global contest

STUDENTS from Jerudong International School (JIS) recently achieved outstanding results in this year’s University of New South Wales International Science and Digital Technology Competition (ICAS).

A participation by 80 JIS students in the Science competition resulted in the awarding of 10 High Distinctions, 32 Distinctions, 25 Credits, four Merits and nine certificates of participation. Of particular note was the Junior School Science medal winner, Jordan Lo, who achieved the highest mark in his age group in Brunei.

In the Digital Technology category, Nicholle Tang, Michael Koh, Jorge Perry, Niaj Sharif and Dominick Ang were awarded medals and High Distinctions while other students – ranging from Year 3 to Year 11 – received 13 Distinctions, eight Credits, two Merits, and nine certificates of participation, according to a press release.

For over 20 years, Educational Assessment Australia (EAA) of the University of New South Wales has been conducting the International Competition for Schools and is the largest independent assessment programme for schools in Brunei, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, India, South Africa, Hong Kong, China and the Pacific region.

Jordan Lo receiving a medal from JIS Head of Junior School, Paul Bannister and his teacher Mr Baker. – PHOTOS: JIS

Jordan Lo receiving a medal from JIS Head of Junior School, Paul Bannister and his teacher Mr Baker. – PHOTOS: JIS

Photographed with their Science teacher, Chris Kruger, are students Nicholle Tang, Dominick Ang, Michael Koh, and Niaj Sharif who all received high distinctions in the Digital Technology category.

Photographed with their Science teacher, Chris Kruger, are students Nicholle Tang, Dominick Ang, Michael Koh, and Niaj Sharif who all received high distinctions in the Digital Technology category.

JIS has been part of this competition – which sees around two million entries annually – for a number of years. The ICAS assess students’ academic ability in aspects of mathematics, science, English language, writing, computer skills and spelling.

The students were praised for their performance, particularly considering the competition took place during the students’ vacation period.

One of the special benefits of ICAS is that schools and students receive detailed diagnostic information about their overall performance. ICAS allow students to monitor their progress from year to year and identify individual strengths and weaknesses.

Borneo Bulletin | September 17, 2016




JIS students attend motivational talk

SOME 300 students from Jerudong International School (JIS) yesterday attended a talk on ‘Lessons Learned from the Front Lines’ delivered by Peter Dalglish, a former United Nations (UN) diplomat organised in conjunction with the school’s Peace Week celebration.

Dalglish during his talk spoke about how the students in attendance can make a difference in climate change, the threat of nuclear proliferation and emerging viruses.

On the threat of global warming, he said, “Climate change will be the issue that defines your generation in ways that you cannot imagine. This school is just a few hundred metres away from the seas; will the school be here in 20 years time? How many homes are covered with solar panels? How many cars are using bio fuels?”

Speaking on reputable volunteer organisations, he said, “You are already in the right school and the right path with the best education. I want you to think about interning with organisations like Doctors Without Borders, Human Rights Watch or United Nations.”

“The best organisation that I have ever seen in humanitarian work is Doctors Without Borders. These are some of the top physicians in the world who are carrying out operations in Syria, Afghanistan and South Sudan. They are in their twenties and thirties and they are heroic in the work that they perform,” he added.

Dalglish during the talk also spoke about his life experiences and his work.

A section of the students during the motivational talk. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

A section of the students during the motivational talk. – PHOTOS: JAMES KON

Peter Dalglish, a former United Nations (UN) diplomat, delivering his talk on ‘Lessons Learned from the Front Lines’.

Peter Dalglish, a former United Nations (UN) diplomat, delivering his talk on ‘Lessons Learned from the Front Lines’.

After an ‘epiphany’ during his mission to a refugee camp in Ethiopia, Dalglish gave up his career as a successful lawyer to work with the poorest children on earth, street children as well as war-affected children.

In 1986, He set up the first of its kind Sudan’s first vocational training school for street children funded by Bob Geldof of Band Aid.

For 50 months until July 1, 2015, the Canadian served as the country representative for UN-Habitat in Afghanistan, directing a team of 600 national and international staff members to address some of the nation’s most urgent urban challenges.

The Himalayan earthquake in April 25, 2015 prompted Dalglish to wrap up his work with the UN so that he could devote more time to assisting on a voluntary basis with earthquake recovery work in Nepal, focusing on communities where he has been active for many years.

Borneo Bulletin | James Kon | September 21, 2016




Renowned humanitarian shares life experiences

Jerudong International School (JIS) Senior School students attend the Lessons Learned From the Front Lines talk by Peter Dalglish yesterday. Picture: BT/ Amanda Yap

Jerudong International School (JIS) Senior School students attend the Lessons Learned From the Front Lines talk by Peter Dalglish yesterday. Picture: BT/ Amanda Yap

WORLD renowned humanitarian Peter Dalglish yesterday gave a talk to senior students of Jerudong International School (JIS) as part of the school’s Peace Week observance.

Dalglish, a Canadian citizen, previously worked as the Head of Mission for the United Nations (UN) Habitat in Afghanistan, in addition to working for the UN in Liberia and Sudan.

He has also carried out earthquake recovery work in Nepal, following the 2015 Himalayan earthquake.

During his talk titled ‘Lessons Learned From the Front Lines’, Dalglish delivered anecdotes and experiences from his years of humanitarian work while shedding light on issues such as conflict-affected children, climate change, nuclear weapons and virus outbreaks.

“A man named Donald Trump wants to build a wall but the issues for your generation defy borders... they are transboundary issues that require an international coordinated approach,” he said.

Dalglish hoped the students who attended his talks would realise that they can make a difference in the world, even from a young age.

“You are people with good education, have the language skills and financial stability to make a difference.

“Find something that you like to do, and get good at it,” he told the students.

Speaking to The Brunei Times, 16-year-old JIS student James Wood said that Dalglish’s talk was “one of the most interesting lectures” he has attended.

“My aspiration at the moment is to become a doctor and after seeing and hearing what he has talked about such as the ‘Doctors Without Borders’ organisation, I think I’m going to do some research on that because it is really brilliant what they are doing,” Wood said.

Peace Week is celebrated annually at JIS, and this year’s theme is “Gender and Equality”, which was based on the UN’s fifth Sustainable Development Goal which is to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”.

Peace Week continues today at JIS, with a variety of activities lined up in honour of the UN International Day of Peace.

The Brunei Times | AMANDA YAP | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN




Bruneians urged to pursue law degree in UK

DOZENS of sixth form students from Jerudong International School (JIS) yesterday attended a talk about the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple.

Patrick Maddams, sub-treasurer of the society, said the Inner Temple is a specialist legal institute based in London where they train lawyers to become a specialist court advocate (barrister).

Maddams said the talk yesterday hoped to attract more Bruneian students to become lawyers and be a part of the Inner Temple. “Recruitment was part of the visit, but it was also to inspire students to think about law as a career and to remind them that knowing the law is only part of being a lawyer,” he told The Brunei Times. He urged Bruneians to study law in the United Kingdom, saying universities there offering law degrees are ranked among the best in the world.

Pg Shahyzul Khairuddien Pg Abdul Rahman and Hjh Noor Amalina Dato Paduka Hj Alaihuddin, former JIS students, who are now working at the Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam, also shared their experiences as law students in the UK.

The Brunei Times | ABDUL AZIZ ISMAIL | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 | BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN